How To Build A Fence Over Concrete?

Can you put a fence on concrete?

When installing a fence on an existing concrete pad, some fence installers prefer to core drill through the concrete and set posts the traditional way – embedded in concrete underground. Using a rented core drill, you can drill a hole through your concrete slab for each fence post.

Should I use concrete or cement for fence posts?

Concrete is the most secure material for setting fence posts, especially if you have sandy soil. Gravel may be okay with dense, clay-heavy soil, but in looser soil, concrete is the only thing that will truly keep your fence posts stuck in place.

How deep should a concrete fence post be?

For example, if you have a 3 inch wide post that you need to sit over 1.83m (6ft) in height above the ground, we recommend the hole size should be: 230mm [wide] (9”) x 600mm [depth]. This rule of thumb that can be followed for all size posts (e.g. a 6ft high fence would require a hole depth of at least 600mm or 2ft).

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How do you install fence posts without concrete?

Backfilling the fence post hole with gravel is another common alternative to using cement. Start with a hole about the size of the one you’d dig if you were using cement, insert a third of the post’s length into the hole, and then fill with crushed gravel, tamping every five inches until flush.

How do you attach something to concrete without drilling?

A simple fix might include an adhesive or adhesive-baked hook, while there are other fasteners like hard wall hooks and masonry nails. Powder-actuated fasteners and concrete nail guns are useful for supporting frames and providing a much greater hold.

What is the best concrete for fence posts?

Fast-setting concrete is ideal for installing fence posts since it doesn’t need to be mixed in a bucket or a wheelbarrow. Once you’ve finished digging your post holes, add about three to four inches of gravel into the bottom and compact it using a post or a 2×4.

How long will a 4×4 post last in concrete?

A pressure treated 4×4 set in concrete should last about 20 years of more, depending on the soil conditions and drainage.

Will wooden posts rot in concrete?

Simply setting the posts in concrete does create a condition that will accelerate rot in the bottom of the posts. With pressure-treated posts, the rot will be slow. The concrete at the top should be sloped away from the post to grade level to avoid water pooling around the base.

Do I need gravel under concrete?

Whether you pour concrete for a walkway or patio, a strong gravel base is required to prevent the concrete from cracking and shifting. Gravel is especially important in clay soil because it doesn’t drain well, which results in water pooling under the concrete slab and slowly eroding the soil as it finally drains.

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Is 2 feet deep enough for fence posts?

Project Instructions



The depth of the hole should be 1/3-1/2 the post height above ground (i.e., a 6-foot tall fence would require a hole depth of at least 2 feet).

How do you keep fence posts from rotting in concrete?

Consider Adding Posts to Concrete



From here, you should fill the hole with about 6 inches of gravel. This will prevent rotting by ensuring that the post is kept dry when water makes its way into the soil. Place the post in the gravel, then fill with a batch of cement until it reaches the top of the hole.

How many bags of Postcrete do you need per post?

You’ll need to bury the posts at least 2ft In the ground. As for how many bags of postcrete you need per post, that’s purely dependant on how big you make the post holes. As a rule of thumb, when using standard post hole diggers, I average 1 bag per post. For larger holes I would allow 1.5 bags to 2 bags per hole.

How long will a treated 4×4 post last in the ground?

The treated post that are rated for ground contact are guaranteed for 40 years.

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