FAQ: Toilet Flange In Concrete?

Does a toilet flange need to be flush with the floor?

5 Answers. The toilet flange needs to be on top of the finished floor. Meaning the bottom edge of the flange needs to be on the same plane as the toilet. So if your toilet sits on the tile, the flange needs to be on top of the tile too.

Does toilet flange go inside or outside pipe?

This toilet flange is designed to glue on the inside of the pipe or expand inside the pipe. Leave the old toilet flange right in place and glue on the new one at the right elevation for the floor, if it’s plastic. The flange should be sitting with the bottom edge flush with the top of the floor.

Can toilet flange be lower than floor?

In a typical toilet installation, the floor flange that sits inside the drain opening below the toilet should be positioned so that its bottom surface rests flush against the finished floor, or no more than 1/4 inch above or below the floor.

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Does a toilet flange need to be glued?

This toilet flange is designed to glue on the inside of the pipe or expand inside the pipe. The bottom of the flange needs to be sitting flush with (or not more than 1/8″ above) the finished floor or else the toilet will rock. The flange should be fastened to the floor. Dry fit the toilet to make sure it doesn’t rock.

How high should a toilet flange be off the floor?

Optimum flange height to aim for is 1/4 inch above the finished floor. This typically allows for almost any type of wax ring to be used and still ensure a good seal.

What if toilet flange is not level?

The toilet should sit on the floor over the flange and still have a little room above the flange for wax to make the seal – it must be shimmed to sit flat, if it rocks (before you install the wax ring). If the toilet sits ON the flange, you won’t be able to keep it sealed properly.

Can you use 2 wax rings when installing a toilet?

You can certainly install a toilet with multiple wax rings, in fact sometimes it is necessary to make sure you don’t have a leak. The most common case is when a homeowner will install a tile floor (or really any thick floor).

How do I know what size toilet flange I need?

One common standard toilet flange size is 4×3, and this is the measurement you will find beside most flanges available at your hardware or plumbing stores. The top side of the flange, which connects to the toilet, is 4 inches in diameter, while the bottom diameter of the pipe is 3 inches.

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Can I use a 3 inch toilet flange?

The 3 – Inch Flanges Many flanges are simply 3 inches in diameter, which means the top and bottom are each 3 inches wide. These flanges must install on a 3 – inch -diameter schedule 40 drain pipe or directly to a 3 – inch closet bend. When installing this type of flange, make sure your piping is sized properly.

Can you put a new toilet flange over an old one?

Either slide the new closet flange bolts into the old flange before adding the extender or add them after you adhere the extender to the old flange. Consequently, we chose to add one of the bolts to the old flange first since it was a tight fit. Add metal washers and nuts to the closet flange bolts.

When should you use a toilet flange extender?

When Do You Need One?

  1. The existing flange was not installed properly.
  2. The existing flange is damaged.
  3. A new floor has been installed and the existing flange is below the newly finished floor.

How do I fill the gap between my toilet and floor?

The easiest way to fix the gap between the toilet and the floor is by sealing it with caulk. Make sure to apply an even amount of caulk to cover the gap and hide any imperfections. For the best mildew resistance caulk, click here.

How do I know if my toilet flange is bad?

If you notice a lot of water pooling at the base of your toilet and inspect to find that your flange is cracked or broken, it’s time for a replacement. Signs of potential flange damage:

  1. Any leak from the bottom of your toilet.
  2. Unpleasant odors.
  3. A loose toilet that shifts or rocks.

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